What is SSD?

SSD (Solid State Drive) is a next-generation data storage device that utilizes solid-state memory to store data persistently. SSD incorporates a number of flash memory modules that are wired with a controller chip. Unlike Hard Disc Drives (HDDs), SSD does not contain moving parts such as spinning magnetic disks and read/write heads. As a result, it offers the following advantages that make it suitable for mobile use:

  • Faster access to data
  • Greater tolerance to shock and vibration
  • Lower power consumption for longer battery life
  • Lighter weight for higher portability

In the past, the major advantage of HDDs over SSD was their larger storage capacity. However, the capacity of SSD has increased every year and the difference is gradually diminishing.

SSDs with RAID 0

Selected VAIO models are equipped with a RAID 0 SSD that employs two disks (known as an array) in one virtual unit to raise storage capacity. RAID 0 technology divides data and writes the divided data to multiple disks. Simultaneous access to multiple disks provides a dramatic increase in data access speed.

Faster access to data

SSD typically reads data faster than HDDs, as it directly accesses data in memory and uses no moving parts like the heads and disks in HDDs. Moreover, SSD RAID 0 provides even faster access than a single SSD. View the videos below to see the difference between SSD and HDD access speed.

File Copying speed comparison

Copying a 1GB text file to the same drive

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  • HDD

  • SSD

File Copying speed comparison

Extracting a 500MB (50% compressed) Zip file on the same drive

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  • HDD

  • SSD

Test units: VAIO Z with Intel® Core™2 Duo 2.53 GHz CPU and 4 GB of memory*. All specifications are the same except on the drives (SSD/HDD).

*Specifications may vary on VAIO Z models available at stores.

Greater tolerance to shock and vibration

Generally, SSD provides greater reliability than HDDs. The contact between magnetic disks and magnetic heads in HDDs can cause crashes during data reading and writing. Since SSD does not feature moving parts and only electronically reads and writes data, there is greater tolerance to shock and vibration. This is a significant advantage for mobile use.